The Animatress Pipeline

Filmmaking Adventures

Henry’s Happy Advice

I got an A-. Not bad for a disruption of three weeks wasted on taking a studio test which led me astray from this class. I swear, if I ever get rich, I will be one of those rich aunts who gives college living expense money to my niece or nephew. This way, they will never have to worry about generating money for supplies and a roof over their heads or to secure post- college employment. They can just concentrate on school which is a full time job within itself. Working can be really detrimental to education if it’s demanding and full time.

Not all in school jobs/internships are as fantabulous as my Space Jam internship where my employers gave me more attention than my teachers at Cal Arts. The school was going through a transition period and some of us were in danger of falling through the cracks. I refuse to let it be yours truly, therefore Tony Cervone, Jeff Seirgey, Harry Sabin, Kurt Anderson, and Kirk Tingblad and Jerry Rees were my teachers for two years.
Thanks you guys.

Anyhoo, here is my very attentive teacher, Henry Garrou of the Academy of Art, advice:

This is probably the most creative of the comps this course. While your
planning laid it all out there, the end result is totally unexpected and well
executed. You found ways to apply so very much of what we’ve learned to
something that is (at least) fresh to me. Thanks!

Good

Missing or Error

Not needed in your comp, or forgivable

My comments may be colored grey if they are neutral
in nature.

Submission

  1. QuickTime  Sorenson 3 Codec Stretched to One Third
    resolution
  2. one “Hero Frame” Full HD Tiff, TGA, or iff
  3. Your final .AEP files

Comp Specs

  1. photorealistic
  2. between 10 and 30 seconds
  3. Full HD

Principles of Compositing

  1. consistent implication of direction and quality of light
    – your comp actually is a great example of how "safe" it can be to work out
    of Maya and render passes into AE for compositing. It’s hard to co wrong
    with direction, color, and quality of light when the same lighting setup
    will produce similar results with multiple passes.
  2. pre-renders, and pre-composites
  3. expressions and controllers
  4. composed entirely of elements that you create
  5. film grain or digital noise – This would have
    helped to take the "CG" out of the beauty pass of the BG, and also could
    have added much to the individual TV screens, as broadcast noise and bands.
  6. depth fog
  7. depth of field – this could have really helped to
    establish scale of the comp, since really small, macro shots have a shallow
    depth of field.
  8. rotoscope masking
  9. green/blue screen extraction
  10. CG shadows
  11. secondary light – You missed a great opportunity
    (I missed it too) to add light falloff for each of the screens that is close
    to the "ground plane." Sorry, I should have caught this and suggested it. No
    points off here. Just remember in the future to think about each element
    isolated. Ask "What is this thing? Does it give off light? Does it reflect?
    etc to infinity and beyond….."
  12. luminance map control layers
  13. color corrected elements
  14. reflections – Again, TV screen might even have
    cast a blurred reflection on the ground plane, maybe not.
  15. traveling mattes – Kudos to you for sticking this
    one out and being patient with me to troubleshoot your file. Thanks!
  16. motion tracking, or image stabilization – While
    you didn’t really motion track or stabilize anything here, you did perform a
    very common form of Match Move by rendering masked image planes our of Maya.
    This can work with trees to thicken up forests, skies to enhance clouds, and
    an infinite number of very similar solutions, where Maya at some point
    generated the camera motion. You can always just use the same camera again.
  17. atmospheric effects
  18. avoiding clipping highlights, and crushing blacks
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